Checkpoint types

Relevant for: GUI tests and components

You can insert the following checkpoint types to check objects in an application:

Checkpoint Type

Description

Standard Checkpoint

Checks property values of an object in your application. For example, you can check that a radio button is activated after it is selected or you can check the value of an edit box.

Standard checkpoints are supported for all add-in environments (see Supported Checkpoints).

For details on standard checkpoints, see Standard checkpoints.

Image Checkpoint
(tests and scripted components only)

Checks the value of an image in your application. For example, you can check that a selected image's source file is correct.

You create an image checkpoint by inserting a standard checkpoint on an image object.

Image checkpoints are supported for the Web add-in environment (see Supported Checkpoints).

For details on image checkpoints, see Standard checkpoints.

Accessibility Checkpoint
(tests and scripted components only)

Identifies areas of your Web site that may not conform to the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. For example, guideline 1.1 of the W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines requires you to provide a text equivalent for every non-text element. You can add an Alt property check to check whether objects that require the Alt property under this guideline, do in fact have this tag.

Accessibility checkpoints are supported for the Web add-in environment (see Supported Checkpoints).

For details on accessibility checkpoints, see Accessibility checkpoints.

Bitmap Checkpoint

Checks an area of your application as a bitmap. For example, suppose you have a Web site that can display a map of a city the user specifies. The map has control keys for zooming. Using the bitmap checkpoint, you can check that the map zooms in correctly.

You can also check that a specific bitmap exists in your application. For example, you can check that your company logo is displayed anywhere on your Web page.

You can create a bitmap checkpoint for any area in your application.

Bitmap checkpoints are supported for all add-in environments. For details, see Supported Checkpoints.

For details on bitmap checkpoints, see Bitmap checkpoints.

Database Checkpoint
(tests and scripted components only)

Checks the contents of a database accessed by your application. For example, you can use a database checkpoint to check the contents of a database containing flight information for your Web site.

Database checkpoints are supported for all add-in environments (see Supported Checkpoints).

For details on database checkpoints, see Database checkpoints.

File Content Checkpoint
(tests only)

Checks the text in a dynamically generated (or accessed) file. For example, suppose your application generates a .pdf. You can check that the correct text is displayed on specific lines in on specific pages in that .pdf.

File content checkpoints are supported for all add-in environments (see Supported Checkpoints).

For details on file content checkpoints, see File Content checkpoints.

Page Checkpoint
(tests and scripted components only)

Checks the characteristics of a Web page. For example, you can check how long a Web page takes to load or whether a Web page contains broken links.

You create a page checkpoint by inserting a standard checkpoint on a page object.

Page checkpoints are supported for the Web add-in environment (see Supported Checkpoints).

For details on page checkpoints, see Page checkpoints.

Table Checkpoint
(tests and scripted components only)

Checks information within a table. For example, suppose your application contains a table listing all available flights from New York to San Francisco. You can add a table checkpoint to check that the time of the first flight in the table is correct.

You create a table checkpoint by inserting a standard checkpoint on a table object. For details on table checkpoints, see Table checkpoints.

Table checkpoints are supported for all add-in environments that have a *Table test object. Table checkpoints are also supported for some list view objects, such as WinListView and VbListView, as well as other list view objects in add-in environments. For details, see Supported Checkpoints.

Text Checkpoint
(tests and scripted components only)

Checks that a text string is displayed in the appropriate place in an application. For example, suppose a Web page displays the sentence Flight departing from New York to San Francisco. You can create a text checkpoint that checks that the words "New York" are displayed between "Flight departing from" and "to San Francisco".

Text checkpoints are supported for most add-in environments (see Supported Checkpoints).

For details on text checkpoints, see Text and text area checkpoints.

Text Area Checkpoint
(tests and scripted components only)

Checks that a text string is displayed within a defined area in a Windows-based application, according to specified criteria. For example, suppose your Visual Basic application has a button that says View Doc <Num>, where <Num> is replaced by the four digit code entered in a form elsewhere in the application. You can create a text area checkpoint to confirm that the number displayed on the button is the same as the number entered in the form.

Text area checkpoints are supported for all Windows-based environments, such as Standard Windows, Visual Basic, and ActiveX add-in environments (see Supported Checkpoints). Text area checkpoints are also supported for some other add-in environments, such as Java.

For details on text area checkpoints, see Text and text area checkpoints.

XML Checkpoint
(tests and scripted components only)

Checks the data content of .xml documents in ,xml files or .xml documents in Web pages and frames. For details on XML checkpoints, see XML checkpoints

The XML Checkpoint (Web Page/Frame) option is supported for the Web add-in environment. The XML Checkpoint option is supported for all add-in environments (see Supported Checkpoints).